Thought Distortion and Writing: On Showing Your Work

Do you remember being in math class when you were little, and getting points taken off your homework because you didn’t show your work? Repeatedly, teachers drilled into our heads how important it was to take the time to write out all of the steps that got you from point A, the problem, to point Z, the solution. At the time, you could sort of see the logic. Sure, a lot of those steps you could combine, or do in your head, but if you wrote them all out, it prevented a lot of confusion, and made it easier for the teacher to follow how you solved it. It also made you less likely to get stuck on a problem, and if you got the wrong answer, it helped those assisting you figure out where you went wrong.

That last point I think is just as crucial when it comes to writing.

Often when I write, I assume that my audience understands where I am coming from. If they have made it onto Smart Women Write, then I assume they are a smart woman writer, or someone who loves smart women who write. If they pick up my specialized academic articles, I assume they have a baseline of knowledge and a shared understanding of the basic historiography, etc.

Often though, those assumptions can cause me to take shortcuts, just like in math class, where in my haste to get it all out, I forget to show my work.  Just like in math class, that can come back to bite me. Or at the very least, it can cause my writing to be less than it should.

That is because things are not as self-evident as they seem. Making those things that are obvious to me more explicit has some rewarding effects when it comes to my writing:  If I examine the thought process that got me from point A to point Z, it is possible I’ll discover some thought distortion– some beliefs that are not accurate or true, or consistent with one another.

Thought distortion happens to every writer, no matter how clear their mind, no matter how mentally well they are. The way someone thinks through an issue has a lot to do with habit and environment, and often as we grow, we discard some habits, while others persist until we excise them. And it’s worth writing out your thought process because these beliefs you’ll find embedded in them, whether they are clear and consistent or not, shape how you feel about something.

I find I am a lot happier, and my writing a lot more authentic, when the beliefs that shape my emotions are rational, logical, consistent, and true to who I am at my core, rather than originating in habit or from my environment.

So the next time you tackle a writing project, give this a try- show some more of your work and look over it. Is there anywhere you went wrong?

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